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Can a Vegan Diet Improve Dry Eye Disease this Veganuary?

Are you thinking about taking part in Veganuary this year? Sufferers of dry eye are constantly on the lookout for solutions to their issues to ease their everyday irritation and pain. But could the secret lie within your diet? 

 

There’s plenty of research that proves there is a link between nutrition and eye health. When it comes to tackling symptoms of dry eye disease it’s important to take a look into your diet and what nutrients and vitamins you may be lacking. A vegan diet can be one of the most nutrient-rich and well-rounded diets in terms of its focus on plants and whole foods, meaning you can meet many of your nutritional needs without any animal products at all. This month is Veganuary, a yearly campaign that aims to get more people to try a vegan diet in January. Could trying it out this year help your eye health? The research suggests that it actually could! 

 

Woman with dry eyes holds her hand to her eye

 

Veganuary and a Plant-based Diet 

 

A plant-based diet focuses on vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans, and legumes. That means often vegans eat far less processed foods than those who would eat a traditional British diet. Vegans don’t consume any animal products or any animal by-products which excludes meat, fish, dairy, eggs, and other foods from their diets altogether. It is entirely possible to get the right nutrition for eye health on a vegan diet through proper planning (just as any diet requires).[1] In fact, many medical professionals believe that it could be the best thing for those with dry eye disease as traditional medical advice for the disease is to lower protein, fat, and cholesterol intake.[2]

 

Hydration for Dry Eye

 

Plant-based diets rich in vegetables and fruits are often very rich in sources of hydration. Additionally, a focus on health with a plant-based diet can link to better habits for hydration overall. It’s been scientifically proven that staying hydrated through the day can ease the symptoms of dry eye disease – especially at night, making it easier to sleep and function through the day.[3] So if you’re bothered by irritated, itchy eyes then it’s time to start upping your hydration through both liquid intake and eating more fresh foods like watermelon, peaches, and cucumber (all suitable for a vegan diet!). Dry eye sufferers should be aiming to drink between eight and ten glasses of water a day.

 

Vitamins in a Vegan Diet 

 

However, a vegan diet offers much more than just hydration for dry eye sufferers. Studies show that dry eye can be improved with a proper diet – including a plant-based one.[4] One of the most important supplements to consider for your dry eyes is omega fatty acids. They can reduce inflammation in the eye, especially in the tear ducts that contribute to many dry eye symptoms. It’s also believed that omega-3 fatty acids can reduce dry eyes as they have an anti-inflammatory effect to help the cells in the retina and corneal heal after damage.[5] Most people see fish as their only source of omega-3s as salmon, halibut, herring, tuna, and molluscs like oysters are all rich in them. However, you can also get omega-3 from seeds like chia seeds and flax seeds, as well as some nuts.[6]

 

Woman rubbing her eyes, suffering from dry eye symptoms

 

When it comes to omega-3s there are three types to be aware of – ALA, EPA, and DHA. The body can convert ALA to EPA and DHA but the amount that’s converted is limited. ALA is a plant-based omega and can be found in many vegetables, seeds, and nuts. However, for adequate eye health, you should ensure you’re getting a good ratio of EPA and DHA. That means a vegan omega supplement might be a boost for your diet in the same way non-vegans often take fish oil as a supplement![7]

As well as omega-3 fatty acids, there are a few vitamins you should consider for your dry eye disease that a vegan diet can be super rich in. Lutein (often considered ‘the eye vitamin’) and zeaxanthin are antioxidants that can decrease the risk of cataracts and prevent eye diseases.[8] You can find lutein and zeaxanthin in leafy dark greens and avocados so grab your salad tongs and get eating. 

If you’ve heard anything about what foods are best for your eye health then you’ve probably heard you need to be eating your carrots. This is because carrots are particularly high in vitamin A content, as are sweet potatoes. Vitamin A helps to maintain a clear cornea, protecting and strengthening your eyes. 

Vitamin C can also help preserve eye health, fighting against dry eye which can develop as you age. Vitamin C is abundant in citrus fruits like oranges, grapefruits, and lemons as well as red peppers. 

If you’d like to find out more about what foods you should be including in your diet for optimal eye health you can check out our blog on the topic – read here. 

When it comes to the foods that are best for dry eyes, nearly every one of the recommended items can be found in a standard vegan diet, meaning you can easily take care of your dry eye disease while taking part in Veganuary. 

 

large bowl of fruit and vegetables as part of a vegan diet

 

Issues with a Plant-Based Diet for Dry Eye

 

As with any diet, a vegan diet lacking balance and adequate nutritional sources will result in ill health. A vegan diet in which you’re not taking into account nutritional needs and supplementation can also result in nutritional problems that can worsen eye health.[9] Vitamin A deficiency in particular can cause issues like xerophthalmia where eyes do not produce tears causing dry eyes. There can be many causes of malnutrition including eating disorders, malabsorption, and vegan or vegetarian diets where nutritional needs are not met.[10] So while you can see malnutrition within a vegan diet, that can be the case with any diet. 

Nowadays, many vegan products are fortified to ensure that all needs are met. It’s more difficult to meet calcium requirements when you forgo calcium-rich dairy foods from your diet by substituting with soy milk as many vegans do. However, there is fortified soy milk available now which can help you meet your requirements and with a proper diet plan to meet all nutritional requirements you can still optimise your health through a vegan diet. Low-fat dairy milk can provide 25% of your fairy calcium in an 8-ounce serving, whereas an 8-ounce serving of original soy milk can provide 35% of your daily calcium needs as well as 130% of vitamin B12 and 35% of calcium.[11]

B12 is a nutrient many people are deficient in – not just vegans. However, the only reliable source of B12 for a vegan diet are fortified foods so supplementing is recommended – especially as vitamin B12 has been shown to improve symptoms of dry eyes by repairing and preserving the corneal nerve layer.[12]

 

woman chopping yellow and red pepper

 

Veganuary and Your Dry Eye Disease 

 

A vegan diet is extremely rich in plant-based foods which are incredible for your eye health. When it comes to tackling your dry eyes some supplementation might be necessary but as long as your diet is considered and varied, you should be able to get all the hydration and vitamins needed to help heal and preserve your dry eyes – and you’ll probably find you’re eating more fresh fruit, vegetables, nuts, and seeds than ever before! As Dr Koetting from the American Optometric Association says, “All diets or eating habits can be done correctly or incorrectly. Knowing what you’re eating, what your body needs and how to make sure it’s in the diet is the important thing.”[13]

Try a month of eating vegan this 2024 for Veganuary and see how it impacts your health. For more information on how diet links to dry eye disease check out our blog on vitamins to boost eye health here.

 

References

  1. Ray, P, ‘Impact of a Vegan Diet on Visual Health’, Vision Science Academy, 01/03/2021, Accessed December 2021
  2. Gregor, M, ‘How to Treat Dry Eye Disease Naturally with Diet’, Nutrition Facts, 31/10/2017, Accessed December 2023
  3. Walsh, N, et al, ‘Is Whole-Body Hydration an Important Consideration in Dry Eye’, IOVS, September 2012, Vol.53, 6622-6627, Accessed December 2023
  4. Capogna, Laurie, ‘The Best Supplements for Dry Eye’, Eye Wellness, 13/07/2021, Accessed December 2023
  5. Dr Vegan, ‘7 Key Nutrients to Support your Eye Health’, Accessed December 2023
  6. Berg Feinfield Vision Correction, ‘6 Foods to Eat to Help Dry Eye’, 27/02/2020, Accessed December 2023
  7. Amandean, ‘Vegan Omega 3 for Dry Eyes’, 04/03/2022, Accessed December 2023
  8. Leighton’s Blog, ‘All-in for Veganuary 2022? The 5 Best Foods for your Eyesight’, 19/01/2022, Accessed December 2023
  9. Cirone, Cristina et al, ‘Linkage Between a Plant-based diet and Age-related diseases: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis’, Nutrition reviews, vol. 81.4, 10/03/2022, Accessed December 2023
  10. Medical News Today, ‘What To Know About Dry Eyes in Kids’, Accessed December 2023
  11. Gonna Need Milk, ‘Milk vs Soy Milk’, Accessed December 2023
  12. Gilbert Eyecare, ‘Should I Take Vitamins if I Have Dry Eye Syndrome’, Accessed December 2023
  13. American Optometric Association, ‘Vegan, Paleo, Gluten-free… Oh My!’, 11/07/2017, Accessed December 2023
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Can dry eyes cause blurry vision?

Yes! Blurry vision is one of the symptoms of Dry Eye Syndrome. This can occur alongside gritty, red, watery, and itchy eyes.[1] In this blog, we’ll be sharing why dry eyes can cause blurry vision and how this can be treated. Read on to find out more.

Does having dry eyes affect vision?

Dry eyes can lead to blurry vision and even make your eyes sensitive to light.[1] Blurry vision is when you can’t see the fine details of the object you’re looking at, making it look hazy.[2] In fact, in a recent study published in the National Library of Medicine, 58% of Dry Eye patients said they had blurry vision.[3] This shows that if you experience this, you’re not alone.

On the other hand, light sensitivity or photophobia is when light causes you pain.[4] This can cause squinting, eye strain, headaches and dizziness.[5] In another study published in the National Library of Medicine, 75% of people over 50 with dry eyes suffered from photophobia.[4] Although you may not be aware of this symptom, it is certainly popular.

Both blurry vision and photophobia can be serious, so please see a GP if you experience these.

Why do dry eyes cause blurry vision?

You can get dry eyes if you don’t make enough tears or the tear film dries up too quickly.[1] You need a normal tear film to be able to see clearly. Because Dry Eye Syndrome affects the tear film, this can affect your vision.[6]

Dry eyes can also impact your cornea. The absence of tear film affects the cornea’s ability to focus light on the lens, which can cause blurry vision. In extreme cases, the cornea can even become infected or develop abnormal blood vessels that interfere with vision.[7]

Why do I have dry eyes and blurry vision when I wake up?

There are many reasons why you may have dry eyes and blurry vision when you wake up. Here are some of them:

1. Nocturnal lagophthalmos

One of the reasons for dry eyes and blurry vision when you wake up is nocturnal lagophthalmos. This is the medical term for sleeping with your eyes open, which up to 20% of people do.[8] When we sleep with our eyes open, this dries the tear film.[9] This causes dry eyes and blurry vision. Read more about this condition in our blog: Nocturnal Lagophthalmos and Dry Eye

2. Reduced tear production

Did you know when you wake up, tear production can drop temporarily? This can make Dry Eye symptoms, like blurry vision, much more noticeable first thing in the morning.[10]

3. Contact lenses

Contact lenses can cause your Dry Eye to flare at the best of times. The presence of the lens on the cornea limits oxygen flow into the eye, and oxygen is necessary to develop natural tears.[11] If you forget to take your contact lenses out before bed, it’s common to wake up with blurry vision as the effects take place. Read our blog for more tips: How to Manage Dry Eye If You Wear Contact Lenses

For more information about the effects of Dry Eye on your body at night, visit our blog: 10 Tips to Ease Dry Eye at Night

Is blurry vision permanent with dry eyes?

If your Dry Eye is treated correctly, your blurry vision symptoms should ease. However, if left untreated, severe dry eyes can ultimately lead to vision loss.[12] For this reason, you should always visit a healthcare professional if you are suffering from dry eye symptoms.

How do you treat blurry vision from dry eyes?

Finding the right treatment for your dry eyes and blurry vision can be difficult. To help, we’ve listed some of the ways that you can treat your dry eyes.

1. Eat healthily

Consuming the right vitamins can make a positive impact on your dry eyes. You should consider adding vitamins to your diet like Vitamin A, Vitamin B, Vitamin C, and Vitamin E. Each of these has health benefits, from lubricating your eyes to maintaining a functioning tear film.[13] For more information on this, visit our blog: 6 Vitamins for Dry Eyes

2. Reduce your screen time

Computer vision syndrome can occur if you spend long periods looking at a screen. This can cause eye problems including blurred sight and double vision.[14] To combat this, consider spending less time on your phone or laptop. If this is unavoidable for purposes such as work, follow the 20:20:20 rule. Every 20 minutes, look at something 20 feet away for 20 seconds.[15] Learn more about this here: What is Computer Vision Syndrome?

3. Stop smoking and drinking

Smoking and drinking can affect your dry eyes. Cigarette smoke can break down the tears on the eye’s surface.[16] Also, alcohol dehydrates the eyes and makes it difficult for the body to produce enough tears.[17] Both of these factors can lead to dry eyes and blurry vision. Find out more here: Is Drinking Alcohol Bad for Your Eyes?

4. Avoid blowing air in your eyes

It can be tempting to have your car heating blowing on you, especially in the colder months. However, this can reduce moisture in your eyes, leading to blurry vision. To avoid this, make sure that you always have heaters pointing towards your body, instead of your face.[18]

5. Use eye treatments

Every dry eye is different, so your treatment will be too! From eye drops to eye gels, there are a variety of ways to soothe your eyes. Visit our new online shop to find a solution for you: Visufarma Shop

 

In most cases, the best way to treat dry eyes, Also known as dry eye syndrome, is to use eye gel or eye drops.

VisuXL Gel® is a preservative-free smart gel lubricant for dry eye syndrome. It provides comfort in a bottle with it’s long-lasting lubrication properties giving 12-hour dosing with just one drop and is suitable for both day and night use.

VisuXL® is a preservative-free eye drop lubricant for dry eye syndrome. Due to its unique ingredients, VisuXL® will help you recover from eye surgery, an injury or persistent damaging dry eye.

VisuEvo® is a preservative-free eye drop that prevents excessive evaporation of the tear film. Its unique formula contains omega-3 essential fatty acids, Vitamins A and D and ultra-filtered phospholipids that facilitate tear film presentation and control evaporation.

All three products are contact lens-friendly and can be used for 180 days after opening.

Shop now

 

References

  1. NHS, ‘Dry eyes’, 06/12/2021. Accessed August 2023.
  2. Vision Express, ‘Blurred vision’. Accessed August 2023.
  3. Szczotka-Flynn LB, Maguire MG, Ying GS, Lin MC, Bunya VY, Dana R, Asbell PA; Dry Eye Assessment and Management (DREAM) Study Research Group. ‘Impact of Dry Eye on Visual Acuity and Contrast Sensitivity: Dry Eye Assessment and Management Study.’ Optom Vis Sci. 2019 Jun;96(6):387-396. Accessed August 2023.
  4. Galor A, Levitt RC, Felix ER, Sarantopoulos CD. ‘What can photophobia tell us about dry eye?’ Expert Rev Ophthalmol. 2016;11(5):321-324. Epub 23/08/2016. Accessed August 2023.
  5. Specsavers, ‘Photophobia (light sensitivity)’. Accessed August 2023.
  6. Cleveland Clinic, ‘Dry Eye’, 28/11/2022. Accessed August 2023.
  7. Smart Eye Care, ‘Are Dry Eyes a Serious Problem?’. Accessed August 2023.
  8. Benisek, A. ‘Can You Sleep With Your Eyes Open?’, WebMD, 11/08/2022. Accessed June 2023.
  9. Takahashi A, Negishi K, Ayaki M, Uchino M, Tsubota K. ‘Nocturnal Lagophthalmos and Sleep Quality in Patients with Dry Eye Disease’. Life (Basel). 2020 July 4;10(7):105. Accessed August 2023.
  10. Lee, Y. B., Koh, J. W., Hyon, J. Y., Wee, W. R., Kim, J. J., & Shin, Y. J. (2014). ‘Sleep deprivation reduces tear secretion and impairs the tear film’. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 55(6), 3525–3531. Accessed August 2023.
  11. Specsavers, ‘Your guide to wearing contact lenses for dry eyes’. Accessed August 2023.
  12. Mayo Clinic, ‘Dry eyes’, 23/09/2022. Accessed August 2023.
  13. Lazarus, R. ‘Which Foods Help Dry Eyes’, Optometrists Network, 17/03/2021. Accessed August 2023.
  14. Nunez, K. ‘7 Ways to Ease Computer Vision Syndrome’, Healthline, 04/03/2021. Accessed August 2023.
  15. Marcin, A. ‘How Does the 20-20-20 Rule Prevent Eye Strain?’, Healthline. Accessed August 2023.
  16. Morgan Griffin, R. ‘Smoking and Dry Eye’, WebMD, 30/05/2023. Accessed August 2023.
  17. You, Young-Sheng, Qu, Nai-Bin, Yu, Xiao-Ning, ‘Alcohol consumption and dry eye syndrome: a Meta-analysis’, International Journal of Ophthalmology, 2016; 9(10): 1487–1492. Accessed December 2021.
  18. Lazarus, R. ‘8 Top Natural Ways to Stop Dry Eyes’, Optometrists Network, 25/11/2021. Accessed August 2023.
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Can the Environment Cause Dry Eyes?

You may have noticed that the change of seasons or new surroundings has suddenly worsened your Dry Eye symptoms. This is because your environment can trigger Dry Eye syndrome, with factors like the weather, climate, and air quality all contributing. Let’s explore some of the specific environmental factors to bear in mind when trying to improve your condition. 

 

Frost on grass

Can the time of year impact dry eyes?

Changes to the air temperature, humidity, and air quality come with the changing seasons. So it’s only natural that throughout certain seasons your eyes may become more irritated and dry. Spring can bring about seasonal allergies such as hay fever when allergens in the air are more prominent. When the pollen count is high, many Dry Eye sufferers will find that their symptoms worsen. However, we’d always recommend speaking to your doctor if this is the case, as often over-the-counter medication such as antihistamines can make Dry Eye symptoms worse as a side effect. 

In addition to this, colder months throughout winter can irritate dry eyes the most when compared to the other seasons. This is because of the cold air outside, combined with indoor heating making a very dry environment. Indoor humidifiers are a good way to try and keep more moisture in your air at home and help to improve your symptoms.[1]

 

Waterfall surrounded by greenery

What climate is best for dry eyes?

Hot, dry air can cause moisture from your eyes to evaporate quickly, yet as we’ve discussed already, colder weather can trigger dry eye syndrome too.  The key is to find a climate that’s not too hot, or too cold. Many researchers have seen a dip in Dry Eye throughout the summer months due to the humid air and warmer temperatures.[1] Therefore, a warm environment with plenty of moisture and humidity in the air is the ideal climate for Dry Eye sufferers.[2] So pack your bags and book that plane ticket, because now you have the perfect excuse to go on holiday!

The impact of living in the city on dry eyes

While living and working in the city can be fun and energising, it can also take a toll on your eyes. Let’s look at some of the common causes of Dry Eye Syndrome in the city.

 

London road with busy traffic

Air pollution

Our eyes are exposed to everything in the air surrounding us, whether that’s fresh air from the countryside, smoke from a fire, or pollution from traffic in the city. When exposed to pollution, small particles of dust and smoke can become stuck in your tear film. This means that you’re not able to produce as many tears to keep your eyes lubricated and moist, which often results in dry, irritated eyes. You can help to ease these symptoms by using umbrellas to shield your face against smog and dust, as well as wrap-around sunglasses to stop these things from going in your eyes. [3]

 

Laptop on a desk, statistics on the screen

Screen time 

When working in cities, it’s often the norm to have a standard 9-5 office job, where you spend most of your day behind a computer screen. In addition to this, many who live in the city rely on public transport such as trains, trams or buses to get to and from work every day. During this commute, the majority of people will be on their phones. Increased screen time can result in a condition called Digital Eye Strain, or Computer Eye Syndrome. It’s a common condition that affects many office workers, yet only 1 in 5 people are aware of having it.[3] Trying to reduce your screen time is the best way to reduce the symptoms of Digital Eye Strain and keep your monitor at eye level when working. 

How to alleviate Dry Eye symptoms

While there is no permanent cure for Dry Eye Syndrome, there are some simple steps you can take to help alleviate your symptoms. 

 

Orange sliced open

Eat more vitamins

Monitoring your diet and increasing the amount of specific vitamins you eat can be useful in reducing dry eyes. Here is a list of the best vitamins for the eyes. 

  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin E
  • Omega 3
  • Vitamin C
  • Flaxseed Oil
  • Zinc
  • Vitamin D
  • Lutein & Zeaxanthin [4]

wraparound sunglasses for dry eye laid on a hat

Wear wrap-around sunglasses

Wearing special wrap-around glasses for dry eyes is a great way to ensure your eyes stay protected from harsh winds, cold air, dust, and debris. These glasses also often feature special lenses which act as a barrier between your eyes and the environment – including allergens like pollen. This makes them a great choice for hay fever sufferers, as the condition can make Dry Eye symptoms worse.[5] 

 

Hands type on a laptop keyboard

Take a break from screen time

As we’ve previously mentioned, screen time is one of the biggest causes of Dry Eye Syndrome. Reducing your screen time where possible will help to relieve your symptoms. Even if you work behind a computer, taking regular breaks from looking at the screen is important. We like to follow the 20/20/20 rule, which is a simple lifestyle change to help remind you to take a break from your screen. The rule is that every 20 minutes, you should look at something which is 20 feet away, for 20 seconds or more. This can be applied when working or watching TV, and numerous studies have found that it’s successful in alleviating Dry Eye symptoms as a result of too much screen time.[6]

For more information on Computer Vision Syndrome, read our blog.

 

Close up of brown eye

Use VisuXL Gel® 

While these lifestyle changes can help to relieve your symptoms of Dry Eye, the best way to feel fully comfortable is to use over-the-counter medications.  VisuXL Gel® provides 12-hour protection with just one drop and works by increasing the moisture in your eyes to form a protective cushion around them.[7]

To find out more about VisuXL® Gel visit our VISUfarma shop.

In most cases, the best way to treat dry eyes, Also known as dry eye syndrome, is to use eye gel or eye drops.

VisuXL Gel® is a preservative-free smart gel lubricant for dry eye syndrome. It provides comfort in a bottle with it’s long-lasting lubrication properties giving 12-hour dosing with just one drop and is suitable for both day and night use.

VisuXL® is a preservative-free eye drop lubricant for dry eye syndrome. Due to its unique ingredients, VisuXL® will help you recover from eye surgery, an injury or persistent damaging dry eye.

VisuEvo® is a preservative-free eye drop that prevents excessive evaporation of the tear film. Its unique formula contains omega-3 essential fatty acids, Vitamins A and D and ultra-filtered phospholipids that facilitate tear film presentation and control evaporation.

All three products are contact lens-friendly and can be used for 180 days after opening.

Shop now

References

  1. Complete Eye Care of Medina, ‘Which season has the greatest impact on dry eyes’. Accessed December 2022.
  2. Seltman, Whitney, ‘Climate, Environment and Dry Eye’ WebMD, 21/06/21. Accessed December 2022.
  3. London Vision Clinic, ‘The effect on your eyes working in the city (London)’ 6/11/15. Accessed December 2022.
  4. Capogna, Laurie, Eye Wellness, ‘The Best Supplements for Dry Eye’ 13/07/21. Accessed December 2022.
  5. Specsavers, ‘Dry Eyes and Glasses Explained’. Accessed December 2022.
  6. Reddy, S. C., Low, C., Lim, Y., Low, L., Mardina, F. and Nursaleha, M. (2013) “Computer vision syndrome: a study of knowledge and practices in university students”, Nepalese Journal of Ophthalmology. Accessed December 2022.
  7. VisuXL Gel Instructions for Use (IFU). Accessed December 2022.
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Dry Eye and Mental Health

Dry Eye Disease impacts not only our physical health but also our mental health.[1] If you’re experiencing some of the negative mental effects of Dry Eye, you’re not alone. In this blog, we’ll be sharing how Dry Eye is linked to your mental health and some ways you can cope with this.

 

Can Dry Eyes be psychological?

There is strong evidence to suggest that Dry Eye Disease can have implications for mental health. A study by Marko Toth in the Journal of Health Psychology and Behavioural Medicine found that symptoms of Dry Eye can be associated with depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder.[2]

There have been numerous other studies done to explore the effects of Dry Eye Disease on Mental Health. For example, a study in the BMJ Open has found that 47% of patients with Dry Eye Disease have mental health difficulties.[3] This is a very worrying statistic and our community is here to support you.

 

Two hands clasped together

 

How can Dry Eyes impact depressive feelings?

In a study by the European Journal of Ophthalmology, 40% of people with Dry Eye had depression.[1] The symptoms of Dry Eye, such as dry and itchy eyes, can have a negative impact on everyday life and make us feel isolated.

 

Can anxiety cause Dry Eye syndrome?

In the study by the European Journal of Ophthalmology, 39% of people suffered from anxiety.[1] Dry Eye Disease can cause us a lot of worry and unease, especially as it can make us feel so disorientated.

 

Woman with hot drink

 

How can I deal with Dry Eye and mental health?

There are a number of things you can do to help your mental health if you are suffering from Dry Eye Disease. Read below to find out more. 

 

Hand turning away wine

 

Drink less alcohol

Mental health problems and alcohol are closely linked because of how it affects our brain and body.[4] Drinking alcohol is also bad for Dry Eye as it increases the sugar levels in your blood. This causes your eyes to swell, meaning your vision can become blurry.[5] Therefore, drinking less can have a positive effect on both your physical and mental health. For more information on alcohol and Dry Eye, visit our blog.

 

Man and woman running

 

Make sure you exercise

The charity, Mind UK, argues that physical exercise can help with mental health issues.[6] If you exercise outdoors, it’s a good idea to wear a pair of wrap-around glasses, which can protect your eyes from windy conditions.[7]

 

Woman making salad

 

Eat healthily

Another strategy to help with your mental health is to eat healthily.[8] This also has benefits for Dry Eye Disease sufferers, as there are certain vitamins that are good for your eyes. For the full list of vitamins to take for Dry Eye, read this blog.

For more information on mental health, please visit the NHS website and consider a service such as Mind.

 

In most cases, the best way to treat dry eyes, Also known as dry eye syndrome, is to use eye gel or eye drops.

VisuXL Gel® is a preservative-free smart gel lubricant for dry eye syndrome. It provides comfort in a bottle with it’s long-lasting lubrication properties giving 12-hour dosing with just one drop and is suitable for both day and night use.

VisuXL® is a preservative-free eye drop lubricant for dry eye syndrome. Due to its unique ingredients, VisuXL® will help you recover from eye surgery, an injury or persistent damaging dry eye.

VisuEvo® is a preservative-free eye drop that prevents excessive evaporation of the tear film. Its unique formula contains omega-3 essential fatty acids, Vitamins A and D and ultra-filtered phospholipids that facilitate tear film presentation and control evaporation.

All three products are contact lens-friendly and can be used for 180 days after opening.

Shop now

 

References

  1. Denise Myshko. ‘Analysis Assesses Relationship Between Dry Eye Disease and Psychiatric Disorders’, Managed Healthcare Executive, 07/08/22. Accessed November 2022
  2. Marko Toth, Nataša Jokić-Begić. ‘Psychological contribution to understanding the nature of dry eye disease: a cross-sectional study of anxiety sensitivity and dry eyes’, Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine, 1(8) 202-119, 28/05/20. Accessed November 2022
  3. Parwez Hossain et al. ‘Patient-reported burden of dry eye disease in the UK: a cross-sectional web-based survey’, BMJ Open, BMJ Journals, 11 (3), 04/03/21. Accessed November 2022
  4. Mental Health Foundation, ‘Alcohol and mental health’, 16/02/22. Accessed November 2022.
  5. Ferrier & Mackinnon Optometrists, ‘Dry January, Not So Dry Eyes’. Accessed November 2022
  6. Mind, ‘Physical activity and your mental health’. Accessed November 2022.
  7. Nall, Rachel. ‘Treating (and Preventing) Dry Eyes in Winter’, Healthline, 30/09/20. Accessed November 2022.
  8. Sutter Health, ‘Eating Well for Mental Health’. Accessed November 2022.
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Can You Wear Makeup When You Have Dry Eye?

You can absolutely wear makeup when you suffer with Dry Eye. Dry Eye Disease shouldn’t stop you doing the things that you love. If you do wish to wear makeup, we can help you work around your condition with some handy tips and tricks.

Eye makeup can clog the meibomian glands in your eyelids, aggravating your Dry Eye symptoms. But, using the right makeup for Dry Eye can make a huge difference when done correctly.[1]

 

Eyeshadow for Dry Eyes

The tiny particles in glitter and powdery eyeshadows can easily get into your eyes, which can cause aggravation. Instead, you should use a cream based eyeshadow.[2]

 

Eyeliner for Dry Eyes

It is suggested that you shouldn’t use eyeliner if you suffer from Dry Eyes as it can irritate your eyelids and harm the production of tears. However, if eyeliner is a must in your makeup bag, it’s better to apply it on the outside of your lash line, instead of the inside. This prevents the makeup particles from making their way into the tear film and harming your eyes.[3] You should also sharpen your eyeliner before every use for this reason.[4]

 

eyeliner and dry eye

 

Mascara for Dry Eyes
Did you know all eye makeup should be discarded after 3 months? Old mascara can go crumbly, allowing big clumps to fall off into your eyes. It’s also best to use thickening mascara, as it flakes much less than the standard bottle.[4]

Ideally, it would be better not to use mascara at all. Instead, use an eyelash curler, which can be bought cheaply at your local supermarket. Plastic curlers are better than metal as the metal ones can cause irritation around your eye.[2]

 

Foundation and Highlighter

Although foundation and highlighters aren’t necessarily eye makeup items, the glitter and powder from these can find their way to your eyes when you apply them. As with eyeshadow, use a thicker cream based version.[2]

 

Permanent makeup for Dry Eye

When it comes to eyelashes, natural is the best option! Eyelash extensions and fake eyelashes should be completely avoided, as these can aggravate blepharitis. Many eyelash tubes of glue also contain formaldehyde, which can dry out the surface of your eyes.[4]

 

dry eye eyelashes

 

Wash your makeup brushes

Makeup brushes can hold dirt, oil and bacteria that can get into the eyes. So, it’s important that they’re washed regularly.[5] It’s recommended to wash your brushes every seven to 10 days, but there is no harm in cleaning them more often.[6]

 

Taking off your makeup with Dry Eye

You should always take your makeup off before you go to bed, to avoid it leaking into your eyes in your sleep or rubbing it in. You should also steer clear of makeup removers that include oil or parabens as these can be irritating.[4]

 

We hope that we have enlightened you with our makeup tips. To find out more about Dry Eye, follow our social channels.

 

In most cases, the best way to treat dry eyes, Also known as dry eye syndrome, is to use eye gel or eye drops.

VisuXL Gel® is a preservative-free smart gel lubricant for dry eye syndrome. It provides comfort in a bottle with it’s long-lasting lubrication properties giving 12-hour dosing with just one drop and is suitable for both day and night use.

VisuXL® is a preservative-free eye drop lubricant for dry eye syndrome. Due to its unique ingredients, VisuXL® will help you recover from eye surgery, an injury or persistent damaging dry eye.

VisuEvo® is a preservative-free eye drop that prevents excessive evaporation of the tear film. Its unique formula contains omega-3 essential fatty acids, Vitamins A and D and ultra-filtered phospholipids that facilitate tear film presentation and control evaporation.

All three products are contact lens-friendly and can be used for 180 days after opening.

Shop now

References

  1. Holliman, Nicole. ‘Makeup Tips for Dry Eye’, Web MD, 08/07/20, Accessed October 2022
  2. Petrosyan, Tamara. ‘Impact of Makeup on Dry Eye Disease’, EyeCare.Org, 11/01/16, Accessed October 2022
  3. Alison, Ng et al. ‘Migration of Cosmetic Products into the Tear Film’, Eye and Contact Lens Science and Clinical Practice, 09/15, 41:5, pp.304-309, Accessed October 2022
  4. HealthLine, ‘Eye Makeup and Dry Eyes: The Inside Scoop’, 07/09/21, Accessed October 2022.
  5. Miller, Korin. ‘How to Clean Your Makeup Brushes – and Why You Need to Do It’, Health, 18/05/21, Accessed October 2022.
  6. American Academy of Dermatology Association, ‘How to Clean Your Makeup Brushes’, Accessed October 2022
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Everything You Need To Know About Dry Eye

Are you suffering from Dry Eye and unsure about why your symptoms occur and what to do about it?
In this blog, we tell you everything you need to know about Dry Eye syndrome, with frequently asked questions that may help you manage your dry eye symptoms.

 

What is the main cause of Dry Eye?

Dry Eye is caused by your eyes not producing enough tears, or your tears drying up too quickly. A number of factors can contribute to this, including looking at electronic screens for too long, being in an air-conditioned, dry or windy environment and drinking alcohol or smoking. Taking certain medications can dry your eyes out too, however, if you stop taking the medication in question your Dry Eye symptoms can go away.[1] Medication should never be stopped without consulting your GP or doctor first, so always check with them before you stop taking anything.

 

How do dry eyes feel?

Dry eyes can feel very uncomfortable, and in more extreme cases, it can be painful. If you have dry eyes they may feel:

  • Gritty
  • Itchy 
  • Sore
  • Watery
  • Sensitive to light
  • Blurry

 Eye drops can help ease this irritation. We advise speaking to a medical professional about what treatment options are right for you.[1]

 

How do dry eyes affect vision?

If you have a mild case of Dry Eye, it is unlikely that it will cause any permanent damage to your eyesight, especially if you receive treatment to ease your symptoms. If you suffer from a more severe case of Dry Eye, the cornea of your eye can become damaged. This can cause you to experience eyesight problems such as blurry or cloudy vision, and in some cases can lead to blindness.[2]

dry eyes and vision

 

What can dry eyes be a symptom of?
Dry eyes can be a symptom of a number of conditions that you may suffer from. Sjogren’s Syndrome affects fluids in the body, including tears, so can therefore cause Dry Eye as a result. Blepharitis is a temporary but uncomfortable condition that can cause gritty and dry feeling eyes.[1] Dry Eye can also be a symptom of menopause. During menopause the decrease in the androgen hormone effects certain glands in the eyes, which produce oils that are essential for tear production. As a result, this can lead to increased tear evaporation and dry eyes.[3]

 

Does Dry Eye go away?
Sometimes Dry Eye symptoms can go away on their own, especially if it’s down to an environmental factor. These factors may be things like prolonged screen use, dry conditions and dietary issues. Often changing these lifestyle factors can reduce or get rid of your symptoms.

If your Dry Eye is a chronic condition, the symptoms can be managed and lessened, but will not completely go away. Chronic Dry Eye means your eyes can’t produce enough tears to keep your eyes moist, so is therefore down to a medical factor rather than a lifestyle factor.[4]

 

Can lack of sleep cause Dry Eye?
Sleep is important for eyes, as studies have shown that for your eyes to properly refresh you need at least five hours of sleep. A lack of sleep can therefore cause Dry Eye, as your eyes have not had enough time to refresh and they are not effectively lubricated. This can lead to pain, light sensitivity, itching, redness or blurry vision.[5]

dry eye and sleep

 

Does drinking water help dry eyes?
Drinking more water helps you stay hydrated, which can in turn help your eyes stay hydrated and moist. You should aim to drink eight to ten glasses of water a day to maintain proper hydration levels and help ease your dry eyes.[6]

 

How can I treat Dry Eye at home?
There are a few ways you can ease your Dry Eye symptoms at home. Ensure you clean your eyes daily, to get rid of any dust or dirt that may be trapped in your eyes. You can do this by soaking a clean flannel in warm water, and placing it over your eyes for five to ten minutes. Then massage your eyelids for around thirty seconds to release any dirt, before wiping it away.[7]

Limit your use of electronic devices, or make sure that you have regular breaks if you need to use screens for work purposes. Purchase a humidifier to add more moisture into the air. If you wear contacts, wear glasses when you can to rest your eyes.[1]

 

Is it ok to use eye drops every day?
You should always listen to your doctor’s advice when it comes to how regularly you use your eye drops, as every case is different. Most eye drops are usually recommended to be taken twice a day, depending on the severity of your symptoms and the kind of eye drops you are using. If you feel that you need more eye drops per day, you should consult with a healthcare professional.[8]

dry eye and eye drops

 

What are the best drops for dry eyes?

Artificial tears are usually the option most commonly used for dry eyes. They keep your eyes moist and help to heal the surface of your eye, which helps to reduce irritation. Some do contain preservatives which can irritate your eyes more if they are particularly sensitive, so make sure to look out for preservative-free options like the VisuXL® drops. 

You can also use allergy drops if your symptoms are caused or worsened by common allergens. They contain antihistamines to stop allergy symptoms like runny nose and itchy, uncomfortable eyes.[9]

In most cases, the best way to treat dry eyes, Also known as dry eye syndrome, is to use eye gel or eye drops.

VisuXL Gel® is a preservative-free smart gel lubricant for dry eye syndrome. It provides comfort in a bottle with it’s long-lasting lubrication properties giving 12-hour dosing with just one drop and is suitable for both day and night use.

VisuXL® is a preservative-free eye drop lubricant for dry eye syndrome. Due to its unique ingredients, VisuXL® will help you recover from eye surgery, an injury or persistent damaging dry eye.

VisuEvo® is a preservative-free eye drop that prevents excessive evaporation of the tear film. Its unique formula contains omega-3 essential fatty acids, Vitamins A and D and ultra-filtered phospholipids that facilitate tear film presentation and control evaporation.

All three products are contact lens-friendly and can be used for 180 days after opening.

Shop now

We hope this article has answered all your Dry Eye questions. However, if not please reach out to us on our socials, join our community on Facebook and Instagram and discover further advice to help your eyes.

 

References

  1. NHS England, ‘Dry Eyes’. Last accessed September 2022
  2. Fletcher, Jenna. ‘You ask, we answer: Can dry eye cause blindness?’, Medical News Today, 04/05/22. Last Accessed September 2022
  3. The Dry Eye Center Of NY & NJ, ‘What’s the Link Between Dry Eye and Menopause?’, 08/04/21, Last Accessed September 2022
  4. Cafasso, Jacquelyn. ‘Your FAQs, Answered: Can Dry Eyes Be Cured?’, Heathline, 03/09/21, Lasted Accessed September 2022
  5. Eye Health North West, ‘How Lack Of Sleep Affects Your Vision’, 20/11/12, Last Accessed September 2022
  6. Complete Eye Care, ‘How Does Hydration Affect My Eyes?’, Last Accessed September 2022
  7. NHS England, ‘Blepharitis’. Last accessed September 2022
  8. Barnet Dulaney Perkins Eye Center,’Are You Overusing Eye Drops?’, 22/05/19, Last Accessed September 2022
  9. WebMD, ‘Do You Use the Right Eye Drops for Your Dry Eyes?’, 21/06/21, Last Accessed September 2022

 

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6 Conditions That Cause Dry Eye

While anyone can develop Dry Eye Syndrome, there are certain conditions that put you more at risk, whether it’s long-term or temporarily. 

In this article, we list some of the most common conditions that cause Dry Eye symptoms, as well as providing tips to relieve your symptoms.

 

Sjogren’s Syndrome

Sjogren’s Syndrome affects fluids in the body like tears and spit. The condition can cause dryness all over the body, including your eyes. There is no cure for the syndrome and the symptoms can be quite uncomfortable. There are a few things you can do to ease your symptoms including protecting your eyes from the environment with sunglasses, limiting reading and screen time and not smoking or drinking alcohol. Medication and eye drops can help with maintaining the moisture in your eyes if you have Sjogren’s Syndrome.[1]

 

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid Arthritis is an autoimmune disease where your immune system attacks cells that line the joints by mistake, which makes them more painful and stiff. In some people, this condition can cause inflammation in other areas of the body, including the eyes.[2] When there is inflammation in the eyes, it can affect the tear ducts which causes them to produce less tears. In addition, it can also affect the production of all 3 layers of the tear film will are essential for optimal comfort and moisture, which can also make your eyes feel more dry.[3] Although there is no cure, if you’re suffering with Rheumatoid Arthritis you can take medications to help your symptoms and slow the progression of the condition. This in turn should help reduce your chances of inflammation in your eyes and therefore prevent Dry Eye.[4]

 

Nocturnal Lagophthalmos (Sleeping With Eyes Slightly Open)

Did you know that 20% of people, including babies, sleep with their eyes slightly open? There are a few reasons why this may happen, but some people are simply just born with issues that prevent them from closing their eyes completely. It can also occur if you suffer from a condition that affects the nerves in your face, which can be caused by a stroke, serious injury or Bell’s Palsy.[5]

 

If your eyes can’t close properly they will dry out, as blinking will be less effective. This is especially the case if you’re sleeping with open eyes, as dust and dirt can enter the eye easier whilst you sleep. Nocturnal Lagophthalmos doesn’t prevent you from sleeping, however as it causes dry eyes and irritation, it can make you more restless.[5]

 

There are treatments to help the problem, as your doctor can give you eye drops or ointments to prevent your eyes from becoming dry. There’s even an option for your doctor to give you a small weight or medical tape to keep your eyes fully closed while you sleep. You should not ignore the condition as it can cause more complications like vision loss, if you don’t seek treatment.[5]

 

Allergies 

Allergies like Hay Fever can trigger symptoms of Dry Eye. Doing outdoor activities when pollen is high in the atmosphere can worsen your symptoms and set off your allergies. These symptoms include eye itchiness and dry eyes. To avoid your reaction to allergens, avoid going outside when you feel your allergies flare up, and prevent yourself from doing activities such as gardening when you feel your eyes become itchy or dry. You can also take allergy medication to help relieve your eye irritation.[6]

hay fever and dry eye

 

Cataracts Surgery 

It’s common to have dry eyes after having cataract surgery, in fact 42% of participants in a 2019 surgery who had cataract surgery said they developed Dry Eye symptoms.[7]

 

The surgery can cause Dry Eye symptoms as it can make the lipid layer of the eye, that stabilises the tear film, thinner. Therefore, the tear film can become unstable and result in creating drier eyes. Dry eyes after cataract surgery may also be due to corneal nerve damage, light exposure, inflammation and medicated eye drops as a result of the surgery itself.[7]

 

Post-surgery Dry Eye symptoms are usually temporary but can be very uncomfortable. The symptoms of Dry Eye after cataracts can be:

  • Eye pain
  • Burning sensation in the eye
  • Higher sensitivity to wind and light
  • Feeling like you have something stuck in your eye
  • Blurry vision

[7]

 

Blepharitis

Blepharitis is not a serious condition, however it can cause uncomfortable symptoms that include dry eyes. Blepharitis symptoms include swollen and itchy eyes, gritty feeling in the eyes and eyelids sticking together.[8]

 

You can treat Blepharitis by cleaning your eyelids twice a day, then once your symptoms improve, you drop this down to once a day. To stop further irritation, use a soft flannel or cotton wool when cleaning your eyes. You should avoid wearing contact lenses and makeup while you have Blepharitis to prevent making your symptoms worse.[8]

 

We hope this article has helped you to recognise the conditions that may be causing your Dry Eye, and how you can help ease your symptoms.

 

In most cases, the best way to treat dry eyes, Also known as dry eye syndrome, is to use eye gel or eye drops.

VisuXL Gel® is a preservative-free smart gel lubricant for dry eye syndrome. It provides comfort in a bottle with it’s long-lasting lubrication properties giving 12-hour dosing with just one drop and is suitable for both day and night use.

VisuXL® is a preservative-free eye drop lubricant for dry eye syndrome. Due to its unique ingredients, VisuXL® will help you recover from eye surgery, an injury or persistent damaging dry eye.

VisuEvo® is a preservative-free eye drop that prevents excessive evaporation of the tear film. Its unique formula contains omega-3 essential fatty acids, Vitamins A and D and ultra-filtered phospholipids that facilitate tear film presentation and control evaporation.

All three products are contact lens-friendly and can be used for 180 days after opening.

Shop now

 

References

  1. NHS England, ‘Sjögren’s syndrome’, Accessed July 2022
  2. NHS England, ‘Rheumatoid arthritis’, Accessed July 2022
  3. Seltman, Whitney. ‘Dry Eye and Inflammation’, WebMD, 09/05/22, Accessed July 2022
  4. NHS England, Rheumatoid arthritis, Accessed July 2022
  5. Benisek, Alexandra. ‘Can You Sleep With Your Eyes Open?’, WebMD, 14/07/20, . Accessed July 2022
  6. Ellis, Mary-Ellen. ‘Managing Dry Eyes in Every Season’, Healthline, 20/08/18, Accessed July 2022
  7. Nunez, Kirsten. ‘Is It Normal to Have Dry Eyes After Cataract Surgery?’, Healthline, 20/10/21, Accessed July 2022
  8. NHS England, ‘Blepharitis’, Accessed July 2022

 

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Everything You Need To Know About Dry Eye Syndrome in Children

While anyone can develop Dry Eye Syndrome, there are certain conditions that put you more at risk, whether it’s long-term or temporarily. 

In this article, we list some of the most common conditions that cause Dry Eye symptoms, as well as providing tips to relieve your symptoms.

 

Sjogren’s Syndrome

Sjogren’s Syndrome affects fluids in the body like tears and spit. The condition can cause dryness all over the body, including your eyes. There is no cure for the syndrome and the symptoms can be quite uncomfortable. There are a few things you can do to ease your symptoms including protecting your eyes from the environment with sunglasses, limiting reading and screen time and not smoking or drinking alcohol. Medication and eye drops can help with maintaining the moisture in your eyes if you have Sjogren’s Syndrome.[1]

 

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid Arthritis is an autoimmune disease where your immune system attacks cells that line the joints by mistake, which makes them more painful and stiff. In some people, this condition can cause inflammation in other areas of the body, including the eyes.[2] When there is inflammation in the eyes, it can affect the tear ducts which causes them to produce less tears. In addition, it can also affect the production of all 3 layers of the tear film will are essential for optimal comfort and moisture, which can also make your eyes feel more dry.[3] Although there is no cure, if you’re suffering with Rheumatoid Arthritis you can take medications to help your symptoms and slow the progression of the condition. This in turn should help reduce your chances of inflammation in your eyes and therefore prevent Dry Eye.[4]

 

Nocturnal Lagophthalmos (Sleeping With Eyes Slightly Open)

Did you know that 20% of people, including babies, sleep with their eyes slightly open? There are a few reasons why this may happen, but some people are simply just born with issues that prevent them from closing their eyes completely. It can also occur if you suffer from a condition that affects the nerves in your face, which can be caused by a stroke, serious injury or Bell’s Palsy.[5]

 

If your eyes can’t close properly they will dry out, as blinking will be less effective. This is especially the case if you’re sleeping with open eyes, as dust and dirt can enter the eye easier whilst you sleep. Nocturnal Lagophthalmos doesn’t prevent you from sleeping, however as it causes dry eyes and irritation, it can make you more restless.[5]

 

There are treatments to help the problem, as your doctor can give you eye drops or ointments to prevent your eyes from becoming dry. There’s even an option for your doctor to give you a small weight or medical tape to keep your eyes fully closed while you sleep. You should not ignore the condition as it can cause more complications like vision loss, if you don’t seek treatment.[5]

 

Allergies 

Allergies like Hay Fever can trigger symptoms of Dry Eye. Doing outdoor activities when pollen is high in the atmosphere can worsen your symptoms and set off your allergies. These symptoms include eye itchiness and dry eyes. To avoid your reaction to allergens, avoid going outside when you feel your allergies flare up, and prevent yourself from doing activities such as gardening when you feel your eyes become itchy or dry. You can also take allergy medication to help relieve your eye irritation.[6]

hay fever and dry eye

 

Cataracts Surgery 

It’s common to have dry eyes after having cataract surgery, in fact 42% of participants in a 2019 surgery who had cataract surgery said they developed Dry Eye symptoms.[7]

 

The surgery can cause Dry Eye symptoms as it can make the lipid layer of the eye, that stabilises the tear film, thinner. Therefore, the tear film can become unstable and result in creating drier eyes. Dry eyes after cataract surgery may also be due to corneal nerve damage, light exposure, inflammation and medicated eye drops as a result of the surgery itself.[7]

 

Post-surgery Dry Eye symptoms are usually temporary but can be very uncomfortable. The symptoms of Dry Eye after cataracts can be:

  • Eye pain
  • Burning sensation in the eye
  • Higher sensitivity to wind and light
  • Feeling like you have something stuck in your eye
  • Blurry vision

[7]

 

Blepharitis

Blepharitis is not a serious condition, however it can cause uncomfortable symptoms that include dry eyes. Blepharitis symptoms include swollen and itchy eyes, gritty feeling in the eyes and eyelids sticking together.[8]

 

You can treat Blepharitis by cleaning your eyelids twice a day, then once your symptoms improve, you drop this down to once a day. To stop further irritation, use a soft flannel or cotton wool when cleaning your eyes. You should avoid wearing contact lenses and makeup while you have Blepharitis to prevent making your symptoms worse.[8]

 

We hope this article has helped you to recognise the conditions that may be causing your Dry Eye, and how you can help ease your symptoms.

 

In most cases, the best way to treat dry eyes, Also known as dry eye syndrome, is to use eye gel or eye drops.

VisuXL Gel® is a preservative-free smart gel lubricant for dry eye syndrome. It provides comfort in a bottle with it’s long-lasting lubrication properties giving 12-hour dosing with just one drop and is suitable for both day and night use.

VisuXL® is a preservative-free eye drop lubricant for dry eye syndrome. Due to its unique ingredients, VisuXL® will help you recover from eye surgery, an injury or persistent damaging dry eye.

VisuEvo® is a preservative-free eye drop that prevents excessive evaporation of the tear film. Its unique formula contains omega-3 essential fatty acids, Vitamins A and D and ultra-filtered phospholipids that facilitate tear film presentation and control evaporation.

All three products are contact lens-friendly and can be used for 180 days after opening.

Shop now

 

References

  1. NHS England, ‘Sjögren’s syndrome’, Accessed July 2022
  2. NHS England, ‘Rheumatoid arthritis’, Accessed July 2022
  3. Seltman, Whitney. ‘Dry Eye and Inflammation’, WebMD, 09/05/22, Accessed July 2022
  4. NHS England, Rheumatoid arthritis, Accessed July 2022
  5. Benisek, Alexandra. ‘Can You Sleep With Your Eyes Open?’, WebMD, 14/07/20, . Accessed July 2022
  6. Ellis, Mary-Ellen. ‘Managing Dry Eyes in Every Season’, Healthline, 20/08/18, Accessed July 2022
  7. Nunez, Kirsten. ‘Is It Normal to Have Dry Eyes After Cataract Surgery?’, Healthline, 20/10/21, Accessed July 2022
  8. NHS England, ‘Blepharitis’, Accessed July 2022

 

Back to news

5 Dry Eye Myths You Need To Know About

While anyone can develop Dry Eye Syndrome, there are certain conditions that put you more at risk, whether it’s long-term or temporarily. 

In this article, we list some of the most common conditions that cause Dry Eye symptoms, as well as providing tips to relieve your symptoms.

 

Sjogren’s Syndrome

Sjogren’s Syndrome affects fluids in the body like tears and spit. The condition can cause dryness all over the body, including your eyes. There is no cure for the syndrome and the symptoms can be quite uncomfortable. There are a few things you can do to ease your symptoms including protecting your eyes from the environment with sunglasses, limiting reading and screen time and not smoking or drinking alcohol. Medication and eye drops can help with maintaining the moisture in your eyes if you have Sjogren’s Syndrome.[1]

 

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid Arthritis is an autoimmune disease where your immune system attacks cells that line the joints by mistake, which makes them more painful and stiff. In some people, this condition can cause inflammation in other areas of the body, including the eyes.[2] When there is inflammation in the eyes, it can affect the tear ducts which causes them to produce less tears. In addition, it can also affect the production of all 3 layers of the tear film will are essential for optimal comfort and moisture, which can also make your eyes feel more dry.[3] Although there is no cure, if you’re suffering with Rheumatoid Arthritis you can take medications to help your symptoms and slow the progression of the condition. This in turn should help reduce your chances of inflammation in your eyes and therefore prevent Dry Eye.[4]

 

Nocturnal Lagophthalmos (Sleeping With Eyes Slightly Open)

Did you know that 20% of people, including babies, sleep with their eyes slightly open? There are a few reasons why this may happen, but some people are simply just born with issues that prevent them from closing their eyes completely. It can also occur if you suffer from a condition that affects the nerves in your face, which can be caused by a stroke, serious injury or Bell’s Palsy.[5]

 

If your eyes can’t close properly they will dry out, as blinking will be less effective. This is especially the case if you’re sleeping with open eyes, as dust and dirt can enter the eye easier whilst you sleep. Nocturnal Lagophthalmos doesn’t prevent you from sleeping, however as it causes dry eyes and irritation, it can make you more restless.[5]

 

There are treatments to help the problem, as your doctor can give you eye drops or ointments to prevent your eyes from becoming dry. There’s even an option for your doctor to give you a small weight or medical tape to keep your eyes fully closed while you sleep. You should not ignore the condition as it can cause more complications like vision loss, if you don’t seek treatment.[5]

 

Allergies 

Allergies like Hay Fever can trigger symptoms of Dry Eye. Doing outdoor activities when pollen is high in the atmosphere can worsen your symptoms and set off your allergies. These symptoms include eye itchiness and dry eyes. To avoid your reaction to allergens, avoid going outside when you feel your allergies flare up, and prevent yourself from doing activities such as gardening when you feel your eyes become itchy or dry. You can also take allergy medication to help relieve your eye irritation.[6]

hay fever and dry eye

 

Cataracts Surgery 

It’s common to have dry eyes after having cataract surgery, in fact 42% of participants in a 2019 surgery who had cataract surgery said they developed Dry Eye symptoms.[7]

 

The surgery can cause Dry Eye symptoms as it can make the lipid layer of the eye, that stabilises the tear film, thinner. Therefore, the tear film can become unstable and result in creating drier eyes. Dry eyes after cataract surgery may also be due to corneal nerve damage, light exposure, inflammation and medicated eye drops as a result of the surgery itself.[7]

 

Post-surgery Dry Eye symptoms are usually temporary but can be very uncomfortable. The symptoms of Dry Eye after cataracts can be:

  • Eye pain
  • Burning sensation in the eye
  • Higher sensitivity to wind and light
  • Feeling like you have something stuck in your eye
  • Blurry vision

[7]

 

Blepharitis

Blepharitis is not a serious condition, however it can cause uncomfortable symptoms that include dry eyes. Blepharitis symptoms include swollen and itchy eyes, gritty feeling in the eyes and eyelids sticking together.[8]

 

You can treat Blepharitis by cleaning your eyelids twice a day, then once your symptoms improve, you drop this down to once a day. To stop further irritation, use a soft flannel or cotton wool when cleaning your eyes. You should avoid wearing contact lenses and makeup while you have Blepharitis to prevent making your symptoms worse.[8]

 

We hope this article has helped you to recognise the conditions that may be causing your Dry Eye, and how you can help ease your symptoms.

 

In most cases, the best way to treat dry eyes, Also known as dry eye syndrome, is to use eye gel or eye drops.

VisuXL Gel® is a preservative-free smart gel lubricant for dry eye syndrome. It provides comfort in a bottle with it’s long-lasting lubrication properties giving 12-hour dosing with just one drop and is suitable for both day and night use.

VisuXL® is a preservative-free eye drop lubricant for dry eye syndrome. Due to its unique ingredients, VisuXL® will help you recover from eye surgery, an injury or persistent damaging dry eye.

VisuEvo® is a preservative-free eye drop that prevents excessive evaporation of the tear film. Its unique formula contains omega-3 essential fatty acids, Vitamins A and D and ultra-filtered phospholipids that facilitate tear film presentation and control evaporation.

All three products are contact lens-friendly and can be used for 180 days after opening.

Shop now

 

References

  1. NHS England, ‘Sjögren’s syndrome’, Accessed July 2022
  2. NHS England, ‘Rheumatoid arthritis’, Accessed July 2022
  3. Seltman, Whitney. ‘Dry Eye and Inflammation’, WebMD, 09/05/22, Accessed July 2022
  4. NHS England, Rheumatoid arthritis, Accessed July 2022
  5. Benisek, Alexandra. ‘Can You Sleep With Your Eyes Open?’, WebMD, 14/07/20, . Accessed July 2022
  6. Ellis, Mary-Ellen. ‘Managing Dry Eyes in Every Season’, Healthline, 20/08/18, Accessed July 2022
  7. Nunez, Kirsten. ‘Is It Normal to Have Dry Eyes After Cataract Surgery?’, Healthline, 20/10/21, Accessed July 2022
  8. NHS England, ‘Blepharitis’, Accessed July 2022

 

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